Sourcing from the Philippines

 

From searching for suppliers to having products shipped, buyers looking to diversify their sourcing within Philippines can find step-by-step support in this guide. In a free, downloadable PDF format, each guide provides information on:

Key export statisticstop trading partners and principal exports
Manufacturing centersmajor production centers, special economic zones and export processing zones
Trade servicestrade offices, services and resources
Banking & financemajor commercial banks and loan availability
Paying for your purchasepreferred payment methods
Export documentationstep-by-step export procedure
Settling trade disputestips to avoid and handle trade disputes

View the complete eBook online by clicking the tabs below. You may also download your free PDF copy here.

Getting orientedKey export statisticsManufacturing centersTrade servicesBanking and financePaying for your purchaseExport documentationSettling trade disputesProduct galleryDownload PDF

Sourcing from Philippines: Getting oriented

Getting oriented highlights international airports, central business districts and common office hours in the Philippines for readers.

Sourcing from Philippines: Key export statistics

This section discusses key industries and products of Philippines. It is part of the Developing Country Sourcing’s Sourcing from Philippines series to empower buyers looking to enter new supplier markets in Asia.

The Philippines is ranked as the 30th largest economy in the world with an estimated GDP of $299 billion in 2015. The economy has weathered global economic shocks better than its regional peers due to less exposure to troubled international securities, lower dependence on exports, relatively resilient domestic consumption, large remittances from 4 million to 5 million overseas Filipino workers and a rapidly expanding outsourcing industry. The country also boasts the 20th largest labor force in the world with 41.75 million workers, according to CIA Factbook.

The Philippines is ranked as the 30th largest economy in the world with an estimated GDP of $299 billion in 2015. The economy has weathered global economic shocks better than its regional peers due to less exposure to troubled international securities, lower dependence on exports, relatively resilient domestic consumption, large remittances from 4 million to 5 million overseas Filipino workers and a rapidly expanding outsourcing industry. The country also boasts the 20th largest labor force in the world with 41.75 million workers, according to CIA Factbook.

Although the Philippine economy has been rising steadily over the past decades, its growth is considered behind many of its Asian neighbors, known as the Asian Tigers or the Group of 20 nations.

Therefore, the Philippines falls into the next tier of emerging markets, sometimes called the Next Eleven or the Tiger Cub Economies. Other Tiger Cub Economies include Indonesia, Malaysia and Thailand.

The country’s total external trade in goods for the first half of 2015 reached $59.6 billion – a decrease of 2.7 percent from $61.3 billion for the same period in 2014.

trading partners

Major trading partners

The top ten trading partners in the country posted a total trade value of $46.4 billion or 78 percent of the cumulative external trade for the first six months of 2015. Among the country’s major trading partners, Japan imported the most woodcrafts and furniture, spending a total of $1.2 billion or 20 percent on the industry in the first half of 2015.

Of the Philippines’ top trading partners, the US spent the most on articles of apparel and clothing accessories for the same period. With a receipt of $617 million, this category was the second largest export from the Philippines to the US behind electronic products.

Polo, Liz Claiborne, Nautica, Ann Taylor, Victoria’s Secret, Nike, and Adidas are some of the popular global brands sourced in the Philippines, attesting to the quality of products the country can make.

Major finished goods exports

The woodcrafts and furniture industry remains a robust line in the Philippines. Ranking 4th among principal exporters, overseas sales in the first half of 2015 reached $1.4 billion, sharing 4.8 percent of the total principal exports. The furniture industry uses a wide variety of materials, including wood, rattan, metal, bamboo, plastic, buri and stone.

Top 10 philippine principal exports

The three major furniture production areas in the Philippines are Metro Manila, Pampanga and Cebu. Furniture made in Metro Manila is typically made of wood mixed with other materials. Pampanga, located in the Central Luzon region, is associated with hand-carved furniture. Cebu, dubbed “the furniture capital of the Philippines”, is known for furniture made of rattan, fossilized stone and wood.

Articles of apparel and clothing accessories ranked 8th, with export receipts totaling $905 million from January to June 2015, or 3.1 percent of total exports.

Other principal exports

Rounding out the top 10 principal exports for the first half of 2015 were electronic products; other manufactures; machinery and transport equipment are chemicals. Other products that made it to the list are ignition wiring sets and other wiring sets used in vehicles, aircrafts and ships; articles of apparel; metal components and coconut oil.

Sourcing from Philippines: Manufacturing centers

This section discusses key manufacturing centers in Philippines. It is part of the Developing Country Sourcing’s Sourcing from the Philippines series to empower buyers looking to enter new supplier markets in Asia.

The Philippines is divided into 81 provinces, which are grouped into 17 regions. Its abundant supply of raw materials makes it home to numerous manufacturing hubs scattered across the archipelago.

Special economic zones

There are 326 Special Economic Zones (SEZ) located throughout the country as of May 2015. These SEZs are mostly privately owned but are overseen by the Philippine Economic Zone Authority (PEZA), a governing agency under the Department of Trade and Industry.

Export processing zones

There are currently 12 Export Processing Zones (EPZ) in the Philippines.

Four are operated by the government through PEZA, and the rest by other government agencies and entities particularly created by law to administer them. EPZs are established to enhance export promotion, attract foreign direct investments and ensure opportunities for employment for the domestic labor force.

Special Economic Zones Philippines

Major production centers

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Incentives

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Sourcing from Philippines: Trade services

This section discusses trade services in Philippines. It is part of the Developing Country Sourcing’s Sourcing from the Philippines series to empower buyers looking to enter new supplier markets in Asia.

The Philippines has embassies and trade offices worldwide working together with the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) to facilitate foreign trade. Most trade offices are attached to the embassies and can assist you in finding the right suppliers.

Many have displays of Philippine products, library facilities with directories and trade publications and staff to answer inquiries about export products, suppliers and manufacturing centers. The staff can also direct you to contacts in the Philippines, including government agencies that assist foreign buyers and trade associations.

Foreign Trade Service Corps

There are more than 26 Foreign Trade Service Corps (FTSC) offices located in 19 countries in Europe, the Middle East, North America, and Asia and the Pacific.

Bureau of Export Trade Promotion

The Bureau of Export Trade Promotion (BETP), under the DTI, formulates and implements plans, programs, projects and strategies to develop, expand and diversify Philippine exports. Buyers unfamiliar with the export policy and procedure in the Philippines and in need of suppliers can benefit from BETP’s various services.

BETP services are offered to exporters, entrepreneurs, foreign buyers, academe/students, other government agencies, trade association and the general public.

India Garments & Textiles Industry Overview Exports

Philippine International Trading Corporation

The Philippine International Trading Corporation (PITC) is the international trading arm of the government. It imports and exports new or non-traditional products and trades with markets not normally pursued by the private sector.

PITC has the resources to supply foreign buyers with a broad range of Philippine products that meet international quality standards.

Foreign chambers of commerce

Foreign chambers of commerce in the Philippines and even in your country can give valuable contacts and insight on doing business in the Philippines.

Philippine Exporters Confederation Inc.

In the Philippines, start your search by visiting the Philippine Exporters Confederation Inc. (Philexport), the largest exporters’ organization.

Philexport is a non-stock, nonprofit, umbrella organization that is mandated to strengthen the country’s export industry through export promotion and development programs. Philexport has 2,351 members representing all product sectors and companies in the export industry.

Trade associations

Associations in key export-oriented industries sometimes offer services that can prove helpful to you. Many are prepared to attend to trade and investment inquiries. They can link up prospective buyers with local manufacturers and arrange buyer-seller meeting.

They also conduct market surveys and organize overseas trade missions. Many associations have publications that can be useful to both manufacturers and overseas buyers.

  • Chamber of Furniture Industries of the Philippines
  • Christmas Décor Producers & Exporters Association of the Philippines
  • Confederation of Garments Exporters of the Philippines
  • Chamber of Handmade Paper Industries of Philippines
  • Cebu Fashion Accessories Manufacturers
  • Exporters Foundation Philippines
  • Fashion Accessories Manufacturer Association
  • Home Accents Group of the Philippines Inc.

Hiring an agent

Some foreign buyers choose to hire an agent in the Philippines to handle purchasing on their behalf.

Getting an agent might be the best option if you do not want to invest a lot of time with the details of sourcing in the Philippines or follow-up work. Agents can locate products and suppliers, perform other groundwork and follow up orders that have been placed.

Checking on your supplier

It might become necessary to check on your prospective supplier’s financial standing, especially when a large amount of order is involved.

One reason is to determine whether the supplier is capable of handling your order and is not in danger of going bankrupt. A close examination of a supplier’s finances will indicate whether the supplier has the means to make good on promises. Given the country’s bureaucracy, however, it is not easy to conduct a satisfactory check. Nevertheless, options exist:

  • Government and private agencies like BETP, PITC and Philexport, which can supply data on request.
  • The exporter’s agent, if any, in the buyer’s country.
  • A foreign trade consultancy, which will undertake the necessary check for a fee.
  • Major credit checking companies

Philexport Services

List of FTSC offices Asia
LocationAddressE-mail
Beijing, ChinaPhilippine Trade and Investment Center. Embassy of the Philippines
JD16-1-081, Jianguomenwai DRC
No. 1 Xiushuijie, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100600, China
[email protected]
Shanghai, ChinaPhilippine Trade and Investment Center, Consulate General of the Philippines
3F MetroBank Plaza, 1160 Yan'an West Road, Shanghai 200052, PROC
[email protected]
Guangzhou, ChinaPhilippine Trade and Investment Center, Consulate General of the Philippines
Rm. 713, Main Tower, Guangdong International Bldg. 339 Huanshi Donglu, Guangzhou , Guangdong 510098, PROC
[email protected]
Tokyo, JapanPhilippine Trade and Investment Center Commercial Section, Embassy of the Philippines
5-15-5 Roppongi, Minato-ku, Tokyo 106-8537, Japan
[email protected]
Osaka, JapanPhilippine Trade and Investment Center, Consulate General of the Philippines
5F Osaka Chamber of Commerce & Industry Bldg., 2-8 Honmachibashi, Chuo-ku Osaka City, Osaka 540-0029, Japan
[email protected]
Seoul, South KoreaPhilippine Trade and Investment Center, Embassy of the Philippines
Rm. 401, 5-1 Itaewon2-dong
Yongsan-gu, Seoul 140-857, Korea
[email protected]
Taipei, TaiwanPhilippine Trade and Investment Center Manila Economic and Cultural Office –
Philippine Representative Office in Taiwan
11F, No. 176 Chang Chun Road, Taipei, Taiwan
[email protected]
SingaporePhilippine Trade and Investment Center, Embassy of the Philippines
07-234 Faber House, 230 Orchard Road, Singapore 238854
[email protected]
Kuala Lumpur, MalaysiaPhilippine Trade and Investment Center, Embassy of the Philippines
1 Jalan Changkat Kia Peng, 50450 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
[email protected]
Jakarta, IndonesiaPhilippine Trade and Investment Center, Embassy of the Philippines
No. 8 Jalan Imam Bonjol, Menteng, Jakarta, Indonesia
[email protected]
Bangkok, ThailandPhilippine Trade and Investment Center, Embassy of the Philippines
760 Sukhumvit Road, Bangkok 10110, Thailand
[email protected]
Sydney, AustraliaPhilippine Trade and Investment Center, Consulate General of the Philippines
Suite 302 Thakral House, 301 George St., Sydney NSW 2000, Australia
[email protected]
New Delhi, IndiaPhilippine Trade and Investment Center, Embassy of the Philippines
50-N Nyaya Marg, Chanakyapuri, New Delhi 110021, India
[email protected], [email protected],
Middle East
LocationAddressE-mail
Islamabad, PakistanPhilippine Trade and Investment Center, Embassy of the Philippines
House 7-A, Kohsar Road, F-7/2 Islamabad, Pakistan
[email protected]
Dubai, United Arab EmiratesPhilippine Trade and Investment Center, Consulate General of the Philippines
Rm. 3712, 37F, Churchill Executive Tower, Business Bay, Dubai, United Arab Emirates (Mailing Address: P.O. Box 14066, Dubai)
[email protected], [email protected],
Jeddah, Saudi ArabiaPhilippine Trade and Investment Center, Consulate General of the Philippines
Umm Al-Kura Street, Al Rehab District, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia
(Mailing Address: P.O. Box 4974 Jeddah 21412, Saudi Arabia)
[email protected]
Europe
LocationAddressE-mail
Berlin, GermanyPhilippine Trade and Investment Center, Embassy of the Philippines
Uhlandstrasse 97, Berlin 10715, Germany
[email protected], [email protected]
Brussels, BelgiumPhilippine Trade and Investment Center, Embassy of the Philippines
207 Ave. Louise, Bte. 5, Brussels 1050, Belgium
[email protected]
Paris, FrancePhilippine Trade and Investment Center, Embassy of the Philippines
CNIT Center 2, Rm. 440, BP 427, 2 Place De La Defense
Paris La Defense 92053, France
[email protected]
Geneva, SwitzerlandTrade and Investment Center
Philippine Permanent Mission to the World Trade Organization
Rue de Lausanne 80, 1902 Geneva, Switzerland
[email protected], [email protected]
London, EnglandPhilippine Trade and Investment Center, Embassy of the Philippines
1A Cumberland House, Kensington Court, London W8 5NX, England
[email protected]
Stockholm, SwedenPhilippine Trade and Investment Center
Nybrogatan 12 SE-114 39 Stockholm, Sweden
Consulate General of the Philippines
[email protected]
North America
LocationAddressE-mail
Washington, D.C., USAPhilippine Trade and Investment Center, Embassy of the Philippines
1600 Massachusetts Ave., Northwest Washington, D.C. 20036, USA
[email protected], [email protected]
New York, USAPhilippine Trade and Investment Center, Consulate General of the Philippines
Philippine Center Level 1M, 556 Fifth Ave., New York 10036, USA
[email protected], [email protected]
San Francisco, CA, USAPhilippine Trade and Investment Center
447 Sutter St., Suite 405, San Francisco, California 94108, USA
[email protected]
Los Angeles, CA, USAPhilippine Trade and Investment Center, Consulate General of the Philippines
Suite 602, 3250 Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, California 90010, USA
[email protected]

Sourcing from Philippines: Banking and finance

This section discusses banking & finance in the Philippines. It is part of the Developing Country Sourcing’s Sourcing from the Philippines series to empower buyers looking to enter new supplier markets in Asia.

Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas

Bangko Sentral ng Pilipinas (BSP) is the central bank of the Republic of the Philippines, established in 1993 and located in Manila. BSP recommends policies in the areas of money, banking and credit. It supervises the operations of banks and exercises regulatory powers over the operations of finance companies and non-bank financial institutions. BSP also has the sole power and authority to issue currency and may regulate or prevent the circulation of foreign currency to avoid reproduction.

In addition, the bank preserves the international value of the Philippine peso and maintains its convertibility for foreign trade payments and other purposes. It is authorized to extend re-discounts, discounts, loans and advances to banking institutions.

Commercial banks

Local commercial banks offer a wide range of services, including deposit and saving accounts, processing of loan applications, handling trade financing transactions and providing guarantees. They also issue letters of credit (L/C), provide foreign remittances services and handle warehousing and custom duties.

As of June 2014, The Philippines has 664 banking institutions with an operating network of over 9,456 branches. Of the 664 institutions, 36 are considered commercial banks, 70 are thrift banks and 558 are rural banks. Although commercial banks are the fewest in number, they account for 90 percent of the total resources of the Philippines’ banking system.

The Development Bank of the Philippines (DBP) is one of three government-owned specialized bank that is considered the principal source of long-term credit. It also serves as the conduit of official government assistance. DBP finances projects in the agricultural and industrial sectors. It also extends loans to public works projects of the government, real estate, financing companies and other sector.

Foreign exchange

Eight foreign commercial banks operate in the Philippines, including Citibank, Bank of America and JP Morgan Chase Bank. These banks offer full banking services and are allowed to provide services similar to those of local commercial banks.

Offshore banking units (OBUs) are ranches, subsidiaries or affiliates of foreign banks that are permitted to conduct offshore banking business in currencies other than the Philippine peso. There are three OBUs currently operating in the Philippines namely BNP Paribas, JP Morgan International Finance and Limited and Taiwan Cooperative bank. They can make loans or accept fund to and from non-residents, other OBUs and foreign currency deposit units (FCDUs) authorized by the BSP. OBUs can also handle remittances from overseas Filipino workers and negotiate letters of credits.

PH commercial banks

There are 15 foreign bank representative offices in the Philippines, including Wells Fargo Bank and Bank of New York Mello.

Availability of loans

Most banks provide short-term pre-shipment export loans and post-shipment export financing. Pre-shipment export loans usually amount to 80 percent of the value of the L/C, PO or sales contract.

Post-shipment loan areas available at 100 percent of the export bills. They are usually paid within a period of not more than 180 days. While factoring or bankers’ acceptance financing is encouraged, it is not nearly as popular as other types of loans. Commercial banks also extend short-term foreign currency loans funded from FCDUs. Some banks have export credit programs directed at small and medium-sized business.

Sourcing from Philippines: Paying for your purchase

This section discusses payment options in the Philippines. It is part of the Developing Country Sourcing’s Sourcing from the Philippines series to empower buyers looking to enter new supplier markets in Asia.

Payment methods

Payment methods

Sourcing from Philippines: Export documentation

This section discusses export documentation in the Philippines. It is part of the Developing Country Sourcing’s Sourcing from the Philippines series to empower buyers looking to enter new supplier markets in Asia.

Export procedure, including documentation, has been simplified to encourage foreign trade and generate foreign exchange earnings.

Export procedure, including documentation, has been simplified to encourage foreign trade and generate foreign exchange earnings.

Only registered businesses can engage in export and import. To set up an export company, you must register with the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI), the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), the city or municipality where you want to operate business and with the Bureau of Internal Revenue (BIR).

Export declaration

For goods that are ready to be shipped, the exporter must first secure an export declaration (ED) form from:

  • Bureau of Export Trade Promotions (BETP)
  • Department of Trade & Industry (DTI) Provincial Offices
  • Bureau of Customs (BOC) Processing Unit
  • One Stop Export Documentation Center (OSEDC) or Philexport offices

If shipping government-regulated products, exporters need to apply for an Export Commodity Clearance/Certificate of Exemption from the proper government commodity office.

Authority to load

The exporter must present all supporting documents to the Export Division of the Bureau of Customs (BOC) where the authorized officer will approve the Authority to Load (A/L).

Loading in Manila

Cargo that’s going to be transported by air is inspected by Bureau of Customs at Ninoy Aquino International Airport (NAIA).

Conventional cargo to be transported by sea, whether containerized or non-containerized, are inspected by the Customs Container Control Division (CCCD) and the Piers and Inspection Division (PID) at the port area, after payment of the wharfage fee and arrastre charges. These charges may be paid at the South Harbor or the Manila International Container Port (MICP).

Export procedures

However, for Board of Investments (BOI) and Philippine Economic Zone Authority (PEZA)-registered companies, stamping or exemption from payment of wharfage fee may be done at the PPA Unit of OSEDC-Manila at Roxas Boulevard. Loading can be conducted at either the North or South Harbor.

Loading at provincial ports

For cargos to be loaded at provincial ports, export documentation may be done in Manila. After approval of the A/L, BOC sends a message to its branch at the port of loading. It is also possible to process documents and secure an A/L from local OSEDEC offices in Clark, Davao, Baguio, Iloilo, General Santos, Cagayan de Oro, Cebu and Subic Bay Special Economic Freeport Zone.

Bills of Lading or Air Waybill

After the shipment is loaded, the customs inspector signs the Report of Loading for Seafreight or Report of Lading for Airfreight. The exporter secures the Bill of Lading for Airfreight from the shipping line or the air way/bill (AWB) from the airlines.

The document signifies an agreement between the shipper and ocean carrier or the shipper and consignee or the carrier and consignee. The document serves as:

  • Receipt for cargo by carrier
  • Certificate of ownership
  • Evidence of contract of carriage

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Among all documents, the ocean B/L is the most important commercial document issued by the shipping company and must conform strictly to the conditions and terms of your L/C. Specific details about the cargo will help avoid discrepancies which may arise due to misclassification, violations of regulations pertaining to explosives or other dangerous articles and export control

Certificate of Origin & Certificate of Shipment

After the goods are loaded, the BOC will issue the following documents on request:

  • Certificate of Origin (CO), Form A, used for export products covered by the Generalized System of Preference (GSP)
  • General Certificate of Origin, used for export products not under GSP
  • Certificate of Origin, Form D, used for export products covered by Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) Common Effective Preferential Tariff Scheme
  • Certificate of Shipment

Payment for export goods

The supplier is normally given 10 working days from loading to submit the following:

  • Letter of credit (L/C)
  • Bill of lading or air waybill (AWB)
  • Commercial invoice
  • Certificate of shipment

Other required supplementary documents

For prepaid shipments, the supplier sends the original commercial and shipping documents to the buyer. However, within 10 days from the date of shipment, the supplier must submit photocopies of these documents to the Authorized Agent Bank (AAB).

Sourcing from Philippines: Settling trade disputes

This section discusses settling trade disputes of Philippines. It is part of the Developing Country Sourcing’s Sourcing from the Philippines series to empower buyers looking to enter new supplier markets in Asia.

Avoiding trade disputes
Most trade disputes in the Philippines arise from non-payment for goods, substandard goods, incorrect quantities and price increases.

Avoiding trade disputes

Most trade disputes in the Philippines arise from non-payment for goods, substandard goods, incorrect quantities and price increases.

Each year, commercial disputes between Filipino exporters and buyers are heard in the Philippines by trade officials, tribunals and courts. Some – not all – are easily resolved, but sometimes resolution only occurs after buyers decide to cut their losses and accept the other party’s settlement proposal.

There are a number of simple precautions which, if done at the outset, can limit or even eliminate the possibility of damage to the buyer.

Trade assistance resources

  • The Department of Trade and Industry (DTI)
  • The Bureau of Trade Promotion (BETP) oversees the country’s export program
  • The Bureau of Export and Trade Promotion‘s (BETP) Export Assistance Network (EXPONET) helps exporters
  • and prospective exporters access information, resolve specific problems related to exporting and handles
  • all trade-related complaints.

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Procedures for complaints

Complaints must be made in writing and submitted under oath by the complainant.

EXPONET (http://www.betp.dti.gov.ph/exponet.htm) assigns a mediating officer to attend to the complainant and identify the parties concerned. If the buyer is involved, the office informs the Philippine trade representative in the buyer’s country. If the supplier is involved, the officer advises the DTI regional or provincial officer.

Arbitration

The inclusion of an arbitration clause in the contract is one of the best ways to effect a fair and speedy settlement of more serious commercial disputes. Conducted under the international arbitration rules of the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCITRAL) to which the Philippines subscribes, or under rules for domestic arbitration, it has the following advantages:

  • It allows the two parties to decide the rules under which arbitration is conducted subject to modifications that they may negotiate and agree on.
  • They can specify a third country as the venue for the hearing and the language to be used.
  • The hearing can be conducted on the basis of documents and other materials or oral evidence by witnesses.
  • The award is final and binding on the parties and carries out without delay.

Protection of intellectual property rights, trademarks and patents

The Intellectual Property Office of the Philippines (IPOPHIL) evaluates patent applications and issuance, trademarks, trade names and service marks.

A trademark has to have been in commercial use in the Philippines for at least two months before the date of filing. The registration is valid for 20 years as long as the owner files an affidavit of use with the bureau within one year from the 5th, 10th and 15th anniversary of the date of issue of the certification.

Patents are issued for an invention, a utility model and an industrial design. For an invention to be patentable, it has to be original, useful, novel or new. A utility model has to be useful, operable and new, while a design has to combine originality with aesthetic value. A patent remains in force for 17 years without extension. The life term of a patent for a design and a utility model is five years, renewable for additional five-year terms.

Foreigners may apply for a Philippine patent provided they are a citizen of a country that grants similar privileges to citizens of the Philippines. An applicant based abroad has to appoint an agent or representative in the Philippines to handle any matter relating to this application.

Sourcing from Philippines: Product gallery

Choose from our gallery of innovative and new products from the Philippines selected by our export consultants and as featured on the Analyst’s Choice section of GlobalSources.com. For more Philippine suppliers and their latest products, visit NewSourcingMarkets.com.

Handmade agate dragonfish statement necklace

Kitsilver Jewellery & Fashion Accessories offers the model KSJ005 fashion necklace.

The dragonfish-inspired pendant is 100 percent handmade. The piece’s 24K gold-plated brass and semi-precious agate stone gives it a distinctively regal look for accessorizing for formal affairs. The pendant’s dimensions are 6.5×0.4×3.5in. The design is customizable.

Kitsilver

Handwoven embroidered women’s hat

This women’s hat from Native Touch Collection Inc. is made from handwoven sinamay of the abaca plant is water-resistant, light and breathable. It has a 57cm diameter. Rimmed with floral embroidery and lace ribbon, its design is clean, practical and fashionable.

native hat

Orbital lounge chair made of wicker

Pacific Arts and Decor International, Inc. offers the model ORN-01 lounge chair. With a fiber glass frame, handwoven PE wicker body, and durable sunbrella outdoor cushions, it can last in various weather conditions.

The chair measures 760x960x960mm and is available in blue, gray and black. This manufacturer also offers love seats, center tables, side table, ottoman and other items in similar materials.

orbital chair

Stainless nebula dining side chair

Murillo’s Export International, Inc. offers the model Nebula LX dining chair. It is made of powder-coated iron frame with stainless steel legs. Its rattan skin backrest binding gives more comfort than a hard plastic.

The chair measures 18.75×34.25×21.75in and is available in blue and ash black. It can also be used as an accent chair in the garden or living room.

chair

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